Friday, March 17, 2006

Netflix



Based on other stand-up routines of hers I expected more. It's funny, it's raw, it's a bit shocking--but too often she has to resort to the physical (exaggerated facial expressions, over-the-top mimicry) to sell what is simply sub-par high-school cafeteria material about fisting and handjobs. A couple political rants feel tacked-on instead of seamlessly evolved through the jokes. But she's finding her voice, she's working out her place. She wants to be George Carlin and Richard Pryor--filthy and irreverent, but with an intellectual veneer and political savvy. Not easy to do, and she's not there yet. She's got a lot of confidence and she's very smart, so I expect great things down the road. Same goes for Sarah Silverman.

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